Sew On The Go is authored by Michelle Renee Hiatt, who is the designer for her own pattern line Sew On The Go as well as Modern 180, a modern pattern division of Deb Tucker's Studio 180 Design. Additionally, Michelle is a certified Studio 180 Design Instructor, as well as a certified Professional Process Expert (LSSMBB); she uses her process improvement techniques and applies them to her quilting and teaching others how to simplify their piecing while improving the quality of their quilt making. Michelle Renee is known for her humor, enthusiasm and encouragement! Michelle can be reached on her website @www.Sewonthego.netor her blogwww.sewonthego.blogspot.com

Wednesday, October 5, 2011

What do you think about the Pdf Quilt Patterns?

I'm not sure if anyone else has seen them, but there seems to be a surge of Online PDF patterns for sale.   I have mixed feelings about them and was wondering what you thought.
I think those who can design and sell patterns are great.  I often think I'd like to give it a try, love the math and all... but do I have the talent for design.. hmmm.   Anyway back to my original question.  For the most part Pattern designing is low risk:
  • Most patterns sell between $8-12.  Why some are $12, I'm not sure, but they better be giving you a lot.  LOL.  Anyway, you figure you design it once, you have the initial fabric cost, time, re-dos, etc.  (aka front research/start-up cost). 
  • You need to write it up and package it.  Which by the way, I think there are designers that really do a great job there and then others, not so much.  Both in photos and directons.
  • Then you determine how much you want invest to sell the pattersn.  Tradionally, your efforts will pay off in volume sold.  You could start off with local shops - just printing a few, marketing them on Etsy (which is where I believe  the downloading originate) - produce a PDF, or try and sell it to a pattern company or start your own pattern company.  The later two probably have you making more samples, getting a booth at market plus having more than one pattern to market....
So, again depending on the volume and such something that cost you $1-3 dollars to produce after the initial investment, you could see wholesale for $4-6 and/or see to the consumer for $8-12....   Decent profit, but you have to have that "wow".

Anyway, so a few years ago, we started seeing the "mom and pops" of pattern designers sell you their patterns online from their personal website.  Often charging a lower fee and no postage if you "download" it.  Which I can understand and appreciate.  They are starting out, and this gives them a way to get a foot in the door without the overhead.

However, now we are starting to see the more "mainstream" (for a lack of a better word) pattern designers and quilt shops selling them online for the same price as the printed patterns.    So, I have mixed thoughts.  I guess it is still a good deal.  One, I guess I like the fact that I don't have to wait for it to be shipped and that I don't have to pay shipping but do I "value"the pattern the same.  I've always thought of "downloading" patterns as free.  I collect them like fabric, since they don't cost anything, but rarely have used a free pattern.  I could probably count on one hand how many times I've made something with a free pattern.

So, if you had the option, do you pay $9 for a printed pattern or $8 for a PDF.

Me, for now, I want the printed pattern.

What about you.



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